Lynx Parallax Irons Review

Hi All,

Some of you may have seen the social media posts or the October Newsletter that I’ve been down at Lynx Golf.

Lynx is a brand most people are aware of, however most may be aware of the them through Nick Doughty and his Tee Time Tips.  However back in the 80’s and 90’s there were a few big players using Lynx on tour.

Fred Couples and Laura Davies being some of the biggest and most successful pro’s to use Lynx. Check out Fred Couples bags and clubs! It’s 1 wood is insane…

Firstly I can’t thank the team enough; they were extremely helpful and welcoming. Allister gave us the tour and was on hand to help during the product testing.  His background stretches from being a PGA Pro, working on tour with Callaway and being a customer fitter and has been with Lynx for the last 5 years.

The purpose of the review is to two fold, one how do they compare to my current clubs which I was custom fitted for when I 1st started playing and are considered to be suitable for my handicap.

Secondly can a smaller golf manufacturer rival the bigger manufacturers in quality, performance and price.

There will be a total of 3 iron reviews which will follow weekly.

Parralax, VT & Black Cat Irons by Lynx Golf

The 1st review was looking at one of their Cavity back irons the Paralllax and the Black Cat Irons.  I currently use Ping I Series irons so all testing was done vs this.

Parallax Irons  are Lynx’s entry level iron a typical cavity back irion. It has a chunky sole that is a lot bigger than the Ping I Series and weight at the bottom of the club. This iron aims to encourage the ball to get up in the air, but also offering forgiveness.

As you would expect it’s got a larger head size and a thicker top line. In all honesty it wasn’t too much different to my Ping’s. Even though the I Series by Ping is more of a game improvement iron…

So how did they compare:

7 iron Stats Parallax Irons Ping I Series
Carry Distance 156 yards 148 yards
Total Distance 169 yards 158 yards
Back Spin 4052 rpm 5776 rpm
Peak Height 33 foot 34 foot

There are some obvious gains with this club, however the slightly bigger head and chunky sole did have an impact on spin rates.  Dispersion left and right was much better, I’ve said it before I suffer from a push or a natural fade. It’s not too dramatic usually less than a 10 yard left to right. However the Parallax clubs had this in check a bit better than my Ping’s which was positive.

Dispersion short and long though was a different story, this could be me causing some of this. However my current Ping’s had a 3 yard variance from my longest to short’s shots as where the Parallax by Lynx had a 7 yard difference. Mainly in part due to the slightly heavier shots, the bigger sole creates more drag when interacting the mat or turf.. With that being said a 7 yard variance still puts it in line with the Ping I series on a heavier shot, but the good shots sees a gain of 8 yards carry and 11 yards over all. It felt quite comparable to the Ping’s which shocked me a little.

Performance is there, who wouldn’t want a 8 yard improvement in carry? Shots with the Parallax felt good as well, you could defiantly feel the weight of the club at the bottom of the down swing which might suit some players over another but it didn’t put me off the club.

Aseptically it’s got something a bit different about it, with the hint of red at the back of the club and the insert on the sole it doesn’t look like every club on the market. Which I quite like but it may not be for everyone, especially those of you who like the traditional look at feel for a golf club.

So to summarise the Parallax Irons by Lynx offer some serious gains in yardage without sacrificing any forgiveness. Looks wise they are nice, but may not be everyone’s cup of tea. The last area to compare is price.

My Ping I Series were 2nd hand, one previous owner which was sold via my club’s pro shop for £260. A quick search on Golf Bidder shows they are still roughly the same price, a fraction cheaper at £240. The I series is a few years old, so to get the closest equivalent brand new you have to move up to the Ping i210’s which brand new custom fitted will be around £750 or a 2nd hand set in the ball park of £370.

The Lynx Parallax brand new custom fitted cost £319 for 5 – PW. Which let’s face it is a really good price. Regardless of the level of golf you play to if a bigger cavity back club that supports distance is what you are after than do no overlook them. From brand new, you are not going to find much better that competes price wise and there are some good stats that back up the performance.  Even comparing these brand new vs the 2nd hand market they stack up as an amazing deal. As for similar money you can go experience custom fitting at their HQ in Surrey or at one of their demo days around the UK and still not bust the bank.

If you want some more info on the Parallax range click here –  https://lynxgolf.co.uk/collections/mens-irons/products/parallax%C2%AE-irons

The next review, which will be out next week is of the Black Cat Irons which are the next level of Cavity Back Irons.

I’m really keen to get your thoughts on this and the next few reviews as i’m planning on doing more product reviews in 2020.. I can only get better with your support and feedback. Leave a comment, message me on social media or send me an email.

Until Next Time, Happy Golfing

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2 thoughts on “Lynx Parallax Irons Review

  1. I enjoyed the review. Upgrades – tell us about the shafts of both sets. Proofread the text autocorrect is not foolproof. Good start and very informative. I live in the US and wasn’t aware Lynx still existed. I had a set back in the 80s.

    Like

    1. Thanks for the feedback, I usally get a proof reader but didn’t on this.. Lesson learnt.
      I’m glad you brought the brand back to life for you. And the shafts were diffrent my pings and stiff and the lynx were regular.
      I’m working on an article around custom fit as I was fitted for my pings around 2 years ago.

      Like

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